Greg Flurry

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Top Stories by Greg Flurry

Sun, IBM, Novell, Oracle and nearly 50 other companies have proposed the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) as a solution for the development and deployment of e-business applications. What is J2EE? What does it offer to developers and users of e-business applications? This article answers these questions and provides a sample application built on J2EE principles. The Promise of J2EE As more business is conducted over the network, enterprises find they can achieve more with less; they can interact with their customers and business partners more quickly and cheaply using networked business-to-business and business-to-consumer applications. These enterprises are conducting e-business. J2EE promises to make e-business even more compelling by defining the means to quickly and inexpensively develop, modify and deploy portable, easy-to-use, reliable, interoperable,... (more)

Connect Non-SOAP HTTP Requesters and Providers to WebSphere Application Server V6 Enterprise Service Bus

This article shows you how to connect non-SOAP HTTP service requesters and providers to the IBM® WebSphere® Application Server V6 Service Integration Bus. This lets requesters and providers leverage the integration capabilities of an enterprise service bus. IBM's WebSphere Application Server V6 (hereafter called Application Server) provides a platform for building an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). Building an Enterprise Service Bus with WebSphere Application Server V6, Part 1: Introduction to WebSphere V6 Messaging Resources is the first part of a series that provides a wealth of... (more)

Connect Non-SOAP HTTP Requesters and Providers to WebSphere Application Server V6 Enterprise Service Bus

This article shows you how to connect non-SOAP HTTP service requesters and providers to the IBM WebSphere Application Server V6 Service Integration Bus. This lets requesters and providers leverage the integration capabilities of an enterprise service bus. Last month's article shows you how to connect non-HTTP service requesters and providers to the IBM WebSphere Application Server V6 Service Integration Bus. This lets requesters and providers leverage the integration capabilities of an enterprise service bus. In this continuation we pick up at Listing 4. Listing 4 shows the detai... (more)

Web Services Development with WSAD 5.0

WebSphere Studio Application Developer (WSAD) version 5.0 is the latest version of IBM's J2EE e-business application development tool. WSAD supports all phases of Web service development: the initial development of components such as JavaBeans or Enterprise JavaBeans, the transformation of those components into Web services, the testing of the Web services, and the publication of the Web services in a UDDI-compliant registry. The focus of this article is Web services development and testing. In a previous article, "Web Services Development with WebSphere Studio Application Devel... (more)

Creating Message-Based Web Services with WebSphere Studio Application Developer: Part 1

WebSphere Studio Application Developer (WSAD) includes support for developing SOAP-based Web services. For example, the WSAD Web Services wizard allows you to turn a JavaBean into a SOAP RPC-based Web service with almost no work. In addition, WSAD can create a proxy for the RPC-based Web service, greatly simplifying its use. Some applications and ser-vices, such as UDDI, require the lower level of control offered by the SOAP message-based model, upon which the RPC-based model is built. Although WSAD doesn't yet provide automated support for SOAP message-based Web services, it's ... (more)